GAMMAGE CUP PDF

In the peaceful land of the small folk , the Minnipins, everything is exactly as it has been for hundreds of years. Everyone is going about their jobs, the Periods descendants of Fooley the Wise are in charge, and the Watercress River is flowing. Everything, except The legendary Gammage Cup is finally going to be moved! Each of the Minnipin towns wants, above all else, to be chosen as the most worthy, the town to hold the Cup. Oh, and the Minnipins' ancient enemies are mining their way in, too.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Erik Blegvad Illustrator. The Minnipins have lost their past. Long ago, the hero Gammage led them in war against the horrible Hairless Ones.

But now -- Bravery? No more. The stuff of storybooks. Yet sometimes heroes turn up when they are least expected Muggles, Gummy the poet, and Walter the Earl are not like the other Minnipins. They dress differently, speak their min The Minnipins have lost their past. They dress differently, speak their minds, and -- when Walter the Earl finds a package of old scrolls and swords -- dare to disagree with the Minnipin leaders. For their troubles, they are banished from their village.

And this time there is no Gammage to protect the Minnipins. This time there are only Muggles and her friends, outlaws who must rescue the very people who have cast them out. Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. More Details Original Title. The Minnipins 1. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other readers questions about The Gammage Cup , please sign up. What can you tell me about the author? Priscilla King She wrote several other books, mostly nonfiction, many on history and anthropology. She also wrote some picture books, the sequel to "The Gammage Cup" …more She wrote several other books, mostly nonfiction, many on history and anthropology.

See 2 questions about The Gammage Cup…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Nov 20, Shiloah rated it really liked it Shelves: childrens-storybooks , personal-reading-challenge , classic-childrens-storybooks , fantasy.

Once a week, I enjoying reshelving library books at the local library as a volunteer. One particular rainy, autumn day, I ran across this book.

The age of the book was what first caught my attention, and I must admit, I often judge a book by its cover. The cover was intriguing. Impulsively I pulled it off the shelf and put it in my check-out pile. The Gammage Cup, by Carol Kendall, was a fun read with an undercurrent of a realistic message: there can easily become an aristocracy in leadership wh Once a week, I enjoying reshelving library books at the local library as a volunteer.

The Gammage Cup, by Carol Kendall, was a fun read with an undercurrent of a realistic message: there can easily become an aristocracy in leadership when people stop thinking for themselves. You have only to look toward the mountains to see that all is peaceful there. Forget the alarms of this day. Good little fantasy story with the underdogs bringing all together in the end.

Like the little ink illustrations and the maps. Did not like the new cover on the Harcourt Odyssey edition that the library had. Much prefer the older original cover. View 2 comments. This is another book I would have absolutely loved when I was younger. There are parts reminiscent of Kneeknock Rise and The City of Ember , although I know this came first so it really should be the other way around.

There was also a part that made me think of The Lord of the Rings due to the swords that glow only when the enemy is near. I really liked the main character, Muggles.

She had so much common sense and untapped leadership ability. It was fun to watch her grow and develop as a characte This is another book I would have absolutely loved when I was younger.

It was fun to watch her grow and develop as a character. I particularly enjoyed Muggles' Maxims at the beginning of some of the chapters. For example, "A net across the Little Trickle won't catch fish in the Watercress River," or "No matter where There is, when you arrive it becomes Here. Everything was wrapped up a bit quickly and easily.

I also had problems with the cover illustration. Obviously the illustrator hadn't read the book, because it just doesn't match. It's a relatively small thing I know, but it always bugs me when the cover is just completely wrong based on details from the story. View all 8 comments. May 17, Michael Fitzgerald rated it really liked it. Problems, but a lot of good things too. There are flaws with this book, starting with the absence of a good description of Minnipins.

Are they a race? A nationality? They are "Small Ones" but are they like The Borrowers? Are they like Hobbits? The dreadful new Brothers Hildebrandt cover shows them as humans - no implication of smallness.

The original Blegvad drawings inside have quite a different look, but still not a lot of information. The title is a bit of a red herring as it is not of prim Problems, but a lot of good things too. The title is a bit of a red herring as it is not of primary concern during the majority of the book which is kind of the point, I know. The British title was changed to The Minnipins - works much better. I'm not crazy about the names: Gummy, Muggles, Mingy, Curley Green - then there's Walter the Earl, which is out of place in its lack of nonsense.

I don't mind the Periods - those are explained somewhat and fit in with the legend and lore. How do these names fit in? There is a little-known short story by Kendall that appeared in , titled "Curley Green Builds a House" - here we find a figure small enough to shelter under a mushroom and who is, curiously enough, male, while the Gammage Curley Green is female. This story has animals named Silly, Solly, Chuckle, Tinsel, etc.

Incidentally, this short story also has a Walter Woodpecker. But alas, there is no significant connection between this story and the book. The description of the Minnipins' land keeps making me think of the Shire, where one finds olde English-sounding names like Samwise and Esmeralda and Rosamunda.

True, there are Hobbits named Bilbo and Frodo and Mungo, but none of these has the English associations that Kendall's names do.

With less silly names, things would be vastly improved. Where Kendall surpasses Tolkien, however, is in character development of these Minnipins. I still could not tell you much about the various dwarves in The Hobbit or the difference between Merry and Pippin and most other Hobbits. Those are largely interchangeable. The primary Minnipins, on the other hand, are very distinctive - we know more about how they think and feel and act.

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The Gammage Cup

Any books donated to Home School Book Review for review purposes are in turn donated to a library. No other compensation has been received for the reviews posted on Home School Book Review. For more information e-mail homeschoolbookreview gmail. Kendall, Carol. The Minnipins live in twelve villages along the banks of the Watercress River in the remote and inaccessible Land Between the Mountains.

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Book Review: The Gammage Cup by Carol Kendall

The Gammage Cup is a children's book by Carol Kendall. It was later republished by Scholastic in November and by Harcourt in It tells the story of a race of little people called the Minnipins who, despite inner divisions, must unite to defend their village and the valley in which they live against an evil race of humanoid creatures called the Mushrooms or Hairless Ones. The sequel, The Whisper of Glocken , was published in Themes in the book include conformity and individualism. The book also includes several references to the real world including the poem Mary Had a Little Lamb and several common abbreviations such as ltd.

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